Kotlin – One for all Part – 2

Kotlin – One for all Part – 2

By | February 28th, 2018
No Comments on Kotlin – One for all Part – 2

You can read Part 1 from here:-

https://devworx.digit.in/etc/kotlin-one-part-1-1104751.html 3. DEFINING

LOCAL VARIABLES: There are two types of variable that you can create in

Kotlin. One is Type defined or Type inferred. Note that if you don’t want

to define the type of the variable then you have to assign some value to

that variable so […]


														
							

You can read Part 1 from here:- https://devworx.digit.in/etc/kotlin-one-part-1-1104751.html

3. DEFINING LOCAL VARIABLES:
There are two types of variable that you can create in Kotlin. One is Type defined or Type inferred. Note that if you don’t want to define the type of the variable then you have to assign some
value to that variable so that the kotlin compiler gets to know about the type of value that the variable will use. Another aspect of Kotlin is you can create Assign-Once variables where the variable behaves as read-only. Or you can create mutable variables where you can manipulate the value of the variable. Here are some examples to help you out.Read Only Variables:
val a: Int = 1 // immediate assignment val b = 2 // `Int` type is inferred val c: Int // Type required
when no initializer is provided c = 3 // deferred as- signment
Mutable Variables
var x = 5 // `Int` type is inferred x += 1 import java.util.* fun demo(source: List) {val list =
ArrayList() // ‘for’-loops work for Java collections:for (item in source) {list.add(item)}
// Operator conventions work as well: for (i in 0..source.size -1) {list[i] = source[i] // get and set are called}}

Calling Kotlin from Java
All the functions and properties declared in, let’s say, a file named ‘example.kt’ inside a package ‘org.foo.bar’,including extension functions, are compiled into static methods of a Java class named ‘org.foo.bar.ExampleKt’.
// example.kt
package demo
class Foo
fun bar() {
}
// Java
new demo.Foo();
demo.ExampleKt.bar();

The name of the generated Java class can be changed using the @Jvm- Name annotation:@file:JvmName(“DemoUtils”) package demo class Foo fun bar() {}// Java new demo.Foo();
demo.DemoUtils.bar();

Having multiple files which have the same generated Java class name (the same package and the same name
or the same @JvmName annotation) is normally an error. However, the compiler has the ability to generate a single Java facade class which has the specified name and contains all the declarations from all the files which have that name. To enable the generation of such a facade, use the @JvmMultifileClass annotation in all of the files that you’ll be working with.

5. JAVASCRIPT KOTLIN INTERPORTABILITY

Being a statically typed language, Kotlin still has to interoperate with untyped or loosely typed environments,such as the JavaScript ecosystem. To facilitate these use-cases, the dynamic type is available in the language:val dyn: dynamic = …The dynamic type basically turns off Kotlin’s type checker: a value of this type can be assigned to any variable or passed anywhere as
a parameter; any value can be assigned to a variable of type dynamic or passed to a function that takes dynamic as a parameter; null-checks are disabled for such values.

The most peculiar feature of dynamic is that we are allowed to call any property or function with any parameters on a dynamic variable:dyn.whatever(1, “foo”, dyn)// ‘whatever’ is not defined anywhere
dyn.whatever(*arrayOf(1, 2, 3))
On the JavaScript platform this
code will be compiled “as is”:dyn.whatever(1) in Kotlin becomes dyn.whatever(1) in the generated
JavaScript code. When calling functions written in Kotlin using values of dynamic type,
keep in mind the name mangling performed by Kotlin to JavaScript compiler. You may need to use the @JsName annotation to assign welldefined names to the functions that you need to call. A dynamic call always returns dynamic as a result, so we can chain such calls freely: dyn.foo().bar.baz()

Using Javascript in Kotlin
Kotlin sees Java classes as Kotlin classes, and Java sees Kotlin classes as Java classes. However, JavaScript is a dynamically-typed language,which means it does not check types in compile-time. You can freely talk to JavaScript from Kotlin via dynamic types, but if you want the full power of Kotlin type system, you can create Kotlin headers for JavaScript libraries.

Inline JavaScript
You can inline some JavaScript code into your Kotlin code using the js(“…”) function. For example: fun jsTypeOf(o: Any): String {return js(“typeof o”)}

The parameter of js is required to be a string constant just like javascript eval. So, the following code is incorrect: fun jsTypeOf(o: Any): String {return js(getTypeof() + “o”) // error reported here}
fun getTypeof() = “typeof”

Calling Kotlin from Javascript

Kotlin compiler generates normal JavaScript classes, functions and properties you can freely use
from JavaScript code. Nevertheless, there are some subtle things you should remember.Isolating declarations in a separate JavaScript object To prevent spoiling the global object, Kotlin creates an object that contains all Kotlin declarations from the current module. So if you name your module as myModule, all declarations are available to JavaScript via myModule object. For example: fun foo() = “Hello”Can be called from JavaScript like so: alert(myModule.foo()); alert(myModule.foo());This is not applicable when you compile your Kotlin module to JavaScript module. In this case there won’t be a wrapper object, instead, declarations will be exposed as a JavaScript module of a corresponding kind. For example, in case of CommonJS you should write: alert(require(‘myModule’).foo()); More on Kotlin can be found on the following link: https://kotlinlang.org/

Google
Ashutosh Gupta
Share a little biographical information to fill out your profile. This may be shown publicly. In WordPress version 2.9, a new filter was added to make changing the [...] string in the excerpt. Do not use both of these methods in